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IELTS Academic Writing task 1 and 2 Structure and how to write answer

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IELTS Academic Writing task 1 and 2

Table of Contents

Writing Task 1: How to Write and Structure it.

In this IELTS Writing Task 1 lesson, you’ll learn the basics of IELTS Academic Writing task 1 and 2 Structure and how to write answer

1) What you need to write about for Task 1
2) How to structure/organize your Report (with an example) and
3) Some important Do’s and Don’ts for Task 1 that everyone should know.


Writing Task 1 Need


You already know a little bit about writing task 1. We have some kind of data, some kind of information graphics that were shown sometimes it’s a graph like a line graph, sometimes a pie chart, a table, map, a process diagram or sometimes a mix of several of this things but the instructions are usually the same.

Instructions:

Explain Overview of Information by selecting main points, and make comparisons where similar. Write 150 words or more.

Now, how many minutes do we need for writing task 1? How many minutes do they recommend? do you know the answer it’s 20?

and Also, important to note that on the band descriptors these are the papers that the examiner uses to score your writing on the band descriptors. In one section, it asks for an overview and so we want to make sure that when we do task one writing. We give a good overview and it’s very clear. So, this is what we need for writing task 1. Summarizing by selecting and reporting the main features, and comparisons and finally an overview.


Writing Task 1 Paragraph Structure


1. Introduction – paraphrase the topic (what is the information graphic about?)The introduction can be one sentence and in the introduction your paraphrasing the topic.

Does information graphic mean? If it’s a chart you can say this chart or the chart compares and describes, displays. In any case, you’re paraphrasing the topic you’re saying the topic in your own words.

2. Overview – Main points mean? (summarize general)The second paragraph is an overview. What are the main points? You’re summarizing in general, overall not in detail but overall. What are the main points and this should be about two sentences?

3. Body Paragraph 1 – What are the specific points? (report on specific). The third paragraph is body paragraph 1. What are the specific points? So, you’re reporting on specifics.

4. Body Paragraph 2 – What are the other specific points? (report on specific). Finally, Body Paragraph 2 is What are the other specific points? You’re reporting on the other specifics.


Do’s and Don’ts


Do

  • Include an overview with the overall features
  • Make lots of comparisons

Do Not

  • Include too much detail in the overview
  • Write about every single detail one by one
  • Include your opinion

Writing Task 1: How to Accurately Analyze Charts, Maps and Process Diagrams


The Writing Task 1 Problem & Solution


The Problem

  • Analyzing charts, maps, and process diagram is HARD.
  • Test takers only have 20 minutes to analyze accurately, plan, and write (and check).

The Solution

  • Focus on your weak area and practice it.
  • If you have trouble with analysis, you need to practice analyzing!
  • Just like athletes who play sports practice the area of their sport they have difficulty with you need to practice just the area you have difficulty with and then you can grow and practice the whole task but for now we’re just going to practice analyzing practice analysis of these charts, maps and process diagrams.


Chart Analysis Question List


When you’re practising analyzing charts. You can use this question list to help you analyze it correctly. In the beginning, you should look at all the questions on the list but as you practice more you can remember the process for analyzing these charts, maps and process diagrams and you don’t need the question list.

1. What kind of data is being shown?

    • a. Explain axes? (for line/bar charts)
    • b. Explain the columns or rows? (table)

2. Give the units of measurement? (e.g. amount, %, age, etc.)

3. Does it show change over time? (this is common in IELTS)

4. What are the time periods shown? (past, present, future)

5. Does the general trend mean? (increase, decrease, etc.)

6. Explain groups or charts?

7. Groups or charts that share similarities?

8. Diveded it into two parts?

    • When I’m writing task 1 reports I tried to write with 4 paragraphs. I have my introduction my overview and then two body paragraphs because this is very logical for me and makes it easy to organize.
    • So, when I look at a graph when I look at the data that the IELTS task gives me I tried to break it into two parts. This is very easy if you have two different charts but it can be more difficult if you only have one chart. So, think about it can you break it logically into two parts.


Chart Analysis Example


IELTS Writing Task 1 Chart Analysis Example

1. What kind of data is being shown?

    • This is a bar chart we’re going to look at the axes. Here, on the Y-axis which is on the left the up and down line. We have men and women in further education and in the thousands.
    • On the X-axis down below we have years and we have 1970 and 1971 this is very interesting.
    • If we look down below this is about education. Education usually has school years so this first one 1970 to 1971. You could just say the 1970 school year very important to notice.

2. Give the units of measurement?

    • We have men and women I think the unit of measurement. We have people so it’s the number of people and it’s in thousands.

3. Does it show change over time?

    • Well, absolutely the X-axis shows school years 1970, 1980, 1990. So, there’s definitely change over time.

4. What are the time periods shown?

    • Do we have anything in the present or future I don’t think So 1970, 1980, 1990, these are all in the past?

5. What is the general trend?

    • First is a full-time education from the beginning to the end. Next female enrollments increased tremendously and they overtook males.
    • Part-time education as a whole is maybe about the same. If you look in 1998 males and females. It’s pretty close may be too close to right about as a general trend

6.  Explain groups or charts?

    • How about full-time education versus part-time education huge difference right part-time education is much more popular from the begging until the end.
    • Females increase the entire time whereas males decreased before recovering slightly.

7. Groups or charts that share similarities?

    • Full-time education for both males and females the black once. These both increased each year. So, this is the similarities that we share and you can also say for females in full-time education and part-time education they increased overall three years.

8. Divided it into two parts?

    • One part about full-time education and one part about full part-time education or you could do one part about males and the other part about females.


Map Analysis Question List


1. Compare more than one map.

2. What are the time periods shown? (past, present, future) Are they in a different map or the same map?

3. Explain the differences between the multiple maps or time periods?

4. Which parts of the map are similar in both maps/time periods?

5. A map is easily broken into two parts? How?


Map Analysis Example


IELTS Writing Task 1 Map Analysis Example

1. Compare more than one map.

    • Yes, there are two maps we can see the before and after.

2. What are the time periods shown? (past, present, future) Are they in a different map or the same map?

    • We have before and we have after but we don’t know is this the past, the present or the future. and they’re on different maps.

3. Explain the differences between the multiple maps or time periods?

    • There are a few differences. Well, we see that there’s been a lot of development in the second map. There’s accommodation now there’s appear their boats that travel to this island so people have started to live on the island there’s a restaurant and there’s a swimming area.

4. Which parts of the map are similar in both maps/time periods?

    • The geography of the map overall is very similar. Not much has changed in terms of the shape of the island the beach is still in the same area the island is still the same shape.

5. A map is easily broken into two parts? How?

    • A map can be easily broken into two parts. Well, if I were writing this how would I break it down into two parts. You could write one about the different building that and also about the transport networks that have been made the footpath and vehicle path.


Process Diagram Analysis Question List


1. Where is the start of the process? The end?

2. How many total stages are there?

3. What kind of process is it? Is it a cycle? Or a linear (start to finish) process?

4. What does each stage do? And what is its connection with the previous stage?

5. What is the end result? Is something produced?

6. Can the process be easily broken into two parts? How?


Process Diagram Analysis Example


Process Diagram Analysis Example  Process Diagram Analysis Example

1. Where is the start of the process? The end?

    • At this process diagram, we actually have two on the Left we have cement production and on the right, we have a concrete production. So, we’re making two different types of things very interesting.
    • But Let’s look at the left one first, In the beginning, we have the top so it starts at the top and it finishes at the bottom. Some process diagrams go from right to left, others go from top to bottom and on the right, I think we’re also going from top to bottom but we just have these different ingredients that are going into the concrete mixer and mixing them so like they’re the only perhaps two steps we don’t know the order on the right one.

2. How many total stages are there?

    • For concrete production, it’s not very clear and even for cement production, we don’t know exactly how many stages there but I’d say for concrete production on the right.
    • we have perhaps two stages two easy stages to write about one is adding all the ingredients and the other is the concrete being mixed so the ingredients being mixed together and cement production.
    • well, we have the limestone and clay go through the crusher they’re made into powder and then go into the mixer. Where they’re passed on to the rotating heater which blows heat into it then they’re moved to the grinder which puts them into cement and then into bags so.
    • I’m not counting right now but you can count how many or make a tally of how many processes it’s not super important that you know how many stages are but if it’s very clear then perhaps you can write how many stages are and if anything it helps you move and understand the process a little bit better.

3. What kind of process is it? Is it a cycle? Or a linear (start to finish) process?

    • Well, I think both of these are linear processes. We have cement production and then we have the concrete production and we don’t finish with the original things again. We finished with a different product. So, it’s a linear start to finish the process.

4. What does each stage do? And what is its connection with the previous stage?

    • For both cement and concrete so I won’t go back through it again but it’s very important to note the connection with the previous stage as well how does it get to that part.

5. What is the end result? Is something produced?

    • Yes, we have bags of cement in the cement production and we the concrete in the concrete production one. So, we definitely have something produced here.

6. Can the process be easily broken into two parts? How?

    • We have two different process diagrams so this is easy to break up into two parts.

Writing Task 2: Introduction

1. The goals of the IELTS Task 2 essay introduction.

2. The only 2 sentences that you need.

3. Introductions for each Task 2 Question Type.

    • A. Opinion
    • B. Discussion
    • C. Problem Solving
    • D. 2-part

4. Common introduction mistakes.

And of course, there will be model introductions and an Action Step in each lesson.


How to Write an Introduction


There are many different ways to write an introduction for IELTS. I recommend this way because it’s fast and easy.


Parts of an introduction


1. The Topic Introduction

    • Topic intro (Task Response) of the task to the reader

2. The General Answer and Plan

    • give your answer (Task Response) to the question
    • explain the structure (Coherence & Cohesion) of your essay to the reader

The first part is the topic introduction and here we’re going to do goal number one which is to introduce the topic of the task to the reader and then the second part is the general answer and plan so you’ll give you answer to the question and you’ll explain the structure now, we have task response coherence and cohesion the reason this is here is because this sentences these parts these goals all have a purpose. I have a reason for every element that we include the first one task response you’re introducing the topic second you’re giving your answer responding to the topic responding to the task and then by explaining the structure you’re improving your coherence and cohesion.

The reader knows what to expect next is very important for your IELTS score.


The 2 Sentences You Need for an Introduction


1. Topic IntroductionParaphrase the topic.

The first part as you probably know is the topic introduction to do this you’re going to paraphrase the topic I mean by paraphrase you should restate topic in your own words.

Example:

The government and citizens of a country sometimes have contrasting views about how their country’s progress should be measured (1).

While I agree that economic growth is essential (Body A), I believe that other forms of progress are just as important (Body B) (2).


Part 1: Opinion Questions


Opinion Questions :

1. Introduce the topic.

2. Give your general opinion (include a structure when possible).

Action Step :

1. Find 3 IELTS Opinion questions (try to find high-quality good questions).

2. Follow my steps to write an introduction for each one.

    • Number two follow my step to write an introduction for each one and always think of the goals why are you writing this introduction you need to introduce the topic you need to give your answer you need to give a structure so that the examiner knows what to expect next.

3. What are they doing well? Where can they improve?


Part 2: Discussion Questions


In lesson number one we looked at steps 1 2 & 3 as well as opinion questions.
In this lesson number two, we’re going to look at discussion questions.

Discussion Questions :

1. General topic intro.

2. Introduce the two sides.

3. Give your general opinion (include a structure when possible).

Action Step:

1. Find IELTS Discussion questions.

2. Follow my steps to write an introduction for it.

3. What are they doing well? Where can they improve?


Part 3: Problem Solving and Two-Part Questions Model Answers


Problem-Solving Questions :

1. Introduce the topic

2. Explain the general cause of the problem and give a general solution.

Model Answer 1 :

In different countries around the world, levels of health and fitness are deteriorating and the average weight is increasing (1). The main causes of these problems are poor nutrition and exercise habits (Body A).
Fortunately, we can solve these issues by focusing on providing healthier food and
more opportunities to exercise. (Body B) (2).

Two-Part Questions :

1. Introduce the topic

2. Give a general answer to the two questions.

Model Answer 2 :

Social technology has changed the way people communicate in the modern world (1). Because of it, people are able to communicate with each other instantly across long distances and maintain relationships throughout life that would never have been possible in the past (Body A). While this technology has also had negative effects on the relationship, overall the advantages far outweigh the drawbacks Body B (2).

Action Step :

1. Find an IELTS Discussion questions

2. Follow my steps to write an introduction for it.

3. What are they doing well? Where can they improve?

IELTS Writing Task 2: How to Organize Your Essay


The Four Paragraph Essay


  • Why is structure important?
    • Because it helps you organize your thoughts write faster which of course is very important in the IELTS and focus on your ideas and language if you need to think about what kind of structure you need then it takes away your ideas and the language or grammar and vocabulary but if you have a good structure then you can focus on your ideas and your language and that makes everything easier
    • So, I recommend using four paragraphs for the IELTS Writing Task 2 essay.
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Body Paragraph 1
      • 3. Body Paragraph 2
      • 4. Conclusion

4 Paragraph Structure1

    • This is not the only way to write an IELTS essay, but I think it’s the easiest. Why is it the easiest because you can use this structure this four-paragraph structure for all of the different IELTS writing task 2 question types.


Task 2 Question Types


1. Opinion Question

In writing task 2 question type examiner give you some topics, scenario and you have to extent agree or disagree?

2. Discussion Question – for e.g. Discuss both sides and give your best own opinion.

It has two different topics or two different sides of one topic and asks you to discuss both sides and give your own opinion.

3. Problem-solving Question – for e.g. Explain this problem and suggest some solutions.

4. Two-part Question Types

There different ways to talk about question types but I think these four are useful for most almost all IELTS questions but remember opinion questions and discussion questions are the most common types so you need to prepare extra well for these types.
Opinion Questions and Discussion Questions are the most common types.


Opinion Question Structure


we are looking at four paragraphs for all of these things the introduction, body paragraph 1, body paragraph 2 and conclusion.

1. Introduction: Topic intro Then, give your opinion.

2. Body Paragraph  1: Discuss your opinion (first theme).

3. Body Paragraph  2: Discuss your opinion (second theme).

4. Conclusion: Re-paraphrase the topic or resize the topic and give your opinion with a couple of extra details from your body paragraphs. No new details. Conclusions don’t have to belong they can be short and sweet for opinion questions again you can agree disagree.


Discussion Question Structure


Example Question:

Few people think that college student should have the freedom to select what they wanted to learn (Side A). Others believe that they have to learn only useful subjects (Side B).

1. Introduction: Topic Intro (both sides).

2. Body Paragraph 1: Discuss one side (opposite side to your Opinion).

3. Body Paragraph 2: Discuss the other side (same side as your opinion).

In the first body paragraph, you should discuss the side that’s the opposite of your opinion and in the second body paragraph, you should discuss the side that’s the same side as your opinion why because if you do this your conclusion will sound very strong because you’re introducing the opposite side first and then you’re telling why that sides good but your side is better and then finally in this conclusion, you’re emphasizing re-emphasizing your opinion after you re paraphrase the topic and give a couple of extra details from your body paragraphs remember not to give any new details.
Giving your opinion, in the beginning, can be easier and faster to write a conclusion.

4. Conclusion: Re-paraphrase the topic and give your opinion with a couple of extra details from your body paragraphs. No new details.


Structure of
Problem Solving Question


Example:

The many numbers of plants and animals are declining.

 Explain that problem and give some suggestion for those solutions.

1. Introduction: Intro to the topic then give suggestions about the problem can be solved.

2. Body Paragraph 1: Explain the problem. Give examples.

3. Body Paragraph 2: Suggest some solutions to this problem.

4. Conclusion: Summarize the problem and your solution with a few specific details from the body paragraphs don’t include any new details and remember your conclusions should be fast and short they don’t need to belong. Your ideas for problem-solving questions don’t have to be amazing. They just need to be well-supported you need to give examples cause and effect needs to be clear.


Writing Task 2: DISCUSSION ESSAY EXAMPLE


Human activities have had negative effects on plant and animal species. Some people think it is too late to solve this problem while others believe that effective measures can still be taken to improve this situation.

First, we need to analyze the task. So, I see that some people think it is too late to solve this problem this is one idea this is one point of view that we’re going to address and the others believe that effective measures can still be taken. Effective measures can still be taken so this is the other point of view and we have these two points of view that we’re going to discuss and then human activities have had negative effects on plant and animal species so plant and animal species is gonna be really big and human activities also really big negative effects, of course, we’re not talking about positive stuff we’re talking about negative stuff.

  • Intro – Effective measures can still be taken
  • Body A: – why some people think it is too late
    • 1. The damage is done, it’s irreversible
      • Urbanization
    • 2. The problems are too big to fix
      • Glaciers (global warming)
      • Pollution
  • Body B: why some people (and me) think that effective measures can still be taken
    • We can still improve spaces for plants and animals
    • In some areas like New Zealand, these efforts have been successful
    • Some people are in denial
  • Conclusion – paraphrase

Human activities have had negative effects on plant and animal species Some people think it is too late to solve this problem while others believe that effective measures can still be taken to improve this situation.

The spread of humanity has had detrimental effects on plant and animal life. While some believe that these problems have become too dire tò improve, others feel that it is not too late and that we can still help revitalize plant and animal species. I believe that we still have the chance to help improve the negative effects we have had on plant and animal species as long as we act soon.

There are several reasons why some people believe that we cannot reverse the negative impact we have had on plants and animals. The first reason is that the kind of problems that we have are irreversible.

For example, now that glaciers have started melting because of global warming, plant and animal habitats will be destroyed and we will not be able to recover them. It is not currently possible to reverse the melting of glaciers and thus these habitats have no chance in the future. The second reason is that some problems are simply too big to fix. Take urbanization for example. Humans are very unlikely to want to reduce the cities and other urban areas that they have created in order to help plants and animals. Because this is unlikely, the chance that these species can be saved is also incredibly low.

Nonetheless, while some believe that these problems are beyond help, others feel that if we enact effective policies, we still have a chance. While some of these people are simply in denial about the seriousness of the impact that humans have had, there has been some evidence that plant and animal ecosystems can revitalize themselves given the right conditions. For example, in New Zealand, there have been successful attempts at creating special zones where human activity is severely limited or not allowed at all. In these places, plant and animal activity has returned to levels that were previously thought unimaginable. If this example can be replicated in other places, we may still have a chance to save these plant and animal species.

In conclusion, while we have undoubtedly destroyed some plant and animal species, people have different opinions on whether this problem can be fixed. Some feel that the effects are beyond repair while I feel that if we act now to establish special zones and plants and animals, we may be able to at least save some of them. (399 words)

IELTS Writing Task 2 Band 9 Essay Planning – Task Topic: Railroads

The Practice Technique: Plan First

Steps 
1: Analyze the Question (2 minutes)
2: Plan the Skeleton (2 minutes)
3: Generate Body Paragraph Details (3 minutes x 2)
4: Write!

You can do this all in just 10 minutes of practices.

Question:
Example: Governments spend money on railways as well as roads. 
Which one do you think is useful for the public?


Step 1: Analyze the Question
(2 minutes)


Answer these questions:

1. Opinion, Discussion, Problem-Solving, or Two-Part?

2. Does the general topic mean? Government spending on transportation

3. What is the specific topic? Government spending on railways vs roads

4. What is the question asking? To what extent do you agree that governments spend more money on railways than roads?


Step 2: Generate a Skeleton Plan
(2 minutes)


Example: Governments spend money on railways as well as roads. Which one do you think is useful for the public?

Skeleton Plan

1. Introduction: paraphrase topic -> opinion = disagree, should spend on both

2. Body 1 Topic: Benefits of railways

3. Body 2 Topic: Why spending money on roads is also necessary

4. Conclusion: re-paraphrase intro and opinion with a couple of extra details


Step 3: Generate Body Paragraph Details
(3 minutes x 2)


Body Paragraph 1: Benefits of railways

    • Public transportation is better for the environment (1)
    • Railways can improve the livability and convenience of city areas (2)
    • Rails can be faster for commuters and decrease car traffic as well (3)

Body Paragraph 2: Why spending money on roads is also necessary

    • Roads need to be maintained (1)
    • Cars are still the most popular way to commute in many places (1)
    • Taking all money away from roads could lead to more crashes, etc. (1)
    • Modern cities are built for cars and ignoring them would be a bad decision (1)

 

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